Ingredients for Brazilian Cooking

Avocado

Originally from South America, avocado is a very versatile fruit (yes, it is a fruit) that can be eaten either in desserts or savoury dishes. Avocado is great in salads, salsas, dips and even soups. Different from other Latin American countries, Brazilians usually prefer to use avocado in desserts, such as mousses and ice-creams. In Australia it is available all year round from any supermarket or grocery stores*, please check your own country’s online stores, supermarkets or South American Grocers for Brazilian ingredients.   List of recipes of this website using avocado: Avocado Ice-Cream with Cashew Nut... read more

Açaí Berry

Açaí is the super deep purple berry from the Amazon which grows in a palm tree and it is known all over the world for its nutritional properties. Açaí is often sold as a frozen pulp or, like in Australia, as part of ingredient of long-life smoothies. To make the addictive açaí in a bowl, simply freeze the smoothie in an ice cube tray, process the cubes in the blender until creamy and serve with your favourite granola or cereal, sliced bananas and plain yoghurt. This smoothie is available online and from selected supermarkets*. *Availability in Australia, please check your own country’s online stores, supermarkets or South American Grocers for Brazilian ingredients. List of recipes of this website using açaí: Açaí in a Bowl with Home-Made... read more

Black Turtle Beans

One of Brazil’s favourite ingredients which is used in two of our most popular dishes: Rice and Beans and Feijoada Black Turtle Bean and Pork Stew. It is widely used in Brazil in all sorts of dishes including stews, soups, mashes and salads. Available from gourmet shops, selected supermarkets and online*. *Availability in Australia, please check your own country’s online stores, supermarkets or South American Grocers for Brazilian ingredients. Feijoada: Pork and Black Bean Stew  ... read more

Banana

Banana is the favourite fruit in Brazil. Along with India, Brazil is the largest producer of bananas and, by far, the largest consumer in the world. Banana is native from Asia, but adapted very well to Brazilian climate and soil making it very cheap and widely available. As a consequence the nutritious banana dishes are our specialty. In Brazil there are hundreds of recipes that include bananas such as cakes, flans, preserves and candies. For breakfast we prepare meals such as banana porridge, mashed bananas with oats and cinnamon or simply roasted bananas that are used as a spread. Raw or crumbed bananas are eaten with fish dishes, beef stews or rice and beans. The banana flour made from green bananas is used to prepare biscuits. From tribute songs, paintings through to being part of Carmen Miranda’s fruit hat, bananas are much more than food in Brazil, they are an integral part of our culture. List of recipes of this website using banana: Acai in a Bowl with Home-Made Granola Upside-Down Banana Cake... read more

Black-Eyed beans

Also known as black-eyed peas, this bean is white with a little black spot. It’s the main ingredient of Brazil’s classic Acarajé Fritters. Great in salads, soups and stews. Available from gourmet shops, selected supermarkets and grocery stores*. *Availability in Australia, please check your own country’s online stores, supermarkets or South American Grocers for Brazilian ingredients. Recipes of this website using black-eyed peas: Black-Eyed Pea Fritters... read more

Brazil Nut

A delicious nut with an earthy flavour indigenous to the Amazon Forest. It can be used in either savoury or sweet dishes. Delicious with dark chocolate, cinnamon and cloves, granola and fish. Available from supermarkets.   List of recipes of this website using brazil nuts: Brazil Nut and Apple... read more

Cachaça

Also known as Pinga, Caninha, Marvada, Bendita, Aguardente, Paraty and many other nicknames, Cachaça is the Brazilian distilled spirit made from sugar cane. Cachaça is the third largest consumed spirit in the world and its main use is in fruit cocktails such as the Brazilian Capirinha or in cooking to marinate meats and flavour desserts. In Australia it is available from large bottle shops and online, check your local bottle shops for availability. List of recipes of this website using cachaça: Chocolate and Cashew Nut Shots with Mini Truffles Mandarin, Mint and Ginger Caipirinha Christmas Boozy Chocolate and Hazelnut Brigadeiro Pastel: Brazil’s Beef Mince Pastry ‘Quentão’: Spicy Brazilian Mulled Wine Classic Caipirinha Lime Cocktail Galinhada: Brazilian Chicken Stew Manjar Prune and Coconut... read more

Cashew

Cashew is a juicy fruit with a distinctive flavour that is indigenous to the northeastern part of Brazil. The fruit is called caju in Portuguese name that originated from the indigenous word akayu which means productive nut. In a botanical sense what we know as the cashew fruit is actually the pseudofruit (or false fruit). In Brazil cashew is eaten fresh and used to make preserves, juices, soft drinks, liqueurs, cakes, desserts and added to savoury dishes. Crystallised cashew is a preserve in which cashews are candied in sugar, water and cloves and then rolled onto raw sugar. Other preserves found are cashew paste, dried cashew or cashew in syrup. After the juice is squeezed the cashew bagasse may be used to make an exotic dish called Fritada de Caju (or fried cashews). The bagasse is stir fried in a very hot pan with olive oil, chopped onions, garlic, tomatoes, capsicum, dried prawns and coriander. Some recipes have coconut milk and on the baked version the fried cashew mixture is topped with beaten eggs and place in the oven until golden. One of the species of cashew grows in gigantic trees.  Located in the city of Parnamirin in the state of Rio Grande do Norte the largest cashew tree in the world covers an area of 8500m2. Due to a genetic abnormality, a continuous cycle of growth happens with the branches of the tree growing up, bending, touching the ground and creating roots. During the cashew season the tree yields more than 70,000 fruits (about 2.5 tons), which is equivalent to the supply of 70 average-sized trees. The tree is located in a national park open for visitation and tourists are welcome to pick as many cashews as they wish.... read more

Cassava Root

Root vegetable indigenous to South America. The fresh vegetable is eaten all over Brazil on a daily basis, served cooked, mashed, deep-fried, as main ingredient for cakes and breads, and to thicken sauces and soups. Frozen cassava is available from large Asian grocers*. *Availability in Australia, please check your own country’s online stores, supermarkets or South American Grocers for Brazilian ingredients. List of recipes of this website using cassava: Cassava... read more

Cassava Flour

It is the flour of the cassava root. It is sold as plain or toasted and in Brazil it is eaten daily all over the country as an accompaniment of meats and cured meats, barbecues, stews and rice and beans. It is also used to make farofas (Brazilian crumbs) and to thicken fish stock (and other stocks).The delicious exotic mixture of stock and cassava flour is known in Brazil as pirão. Available online*. List of recipes of this website using cassava flour: When Brazil meets Australia Lamb Shanks Moqueca: Bahia’s Fish Stew Feijoada: Pork and Black Bean Stew Osvaldo Aranha’s Steak Meal Galinhada: Brazilian Chicken Stew    ... read more

Cashew Nut

The cashew nut is the seed of the cashew fruit. In Brazil is particularly used to make sweets like bon-bons, truffles and pralines. Available from most supermarkets. List of recipes of this website using cashew nuts: Chocolate and Cashew Nut Shots with Mini Truffles Romeo and Juliet Goat’s Cheese and Guava Paste Panna Cotta Avocado Ice-Cream with Cashew Nut Brittle Vatapá Nut Puree with... read more

Catupiry Cheese

This is the classic Brazilian soft mild cheese. It’s beautiful with chicken, hearts of palm, as pizza topping in a four cheese pizza, green vegetable pies and salads. In my recipes I use Port Salut or a mild soft cheese as a... read more

Choko or Chayote

Native from Mexico, choko is used in Brazil as an ingredient of salads, soups and bakes. Available from selected fruit and vegetable markets and large supermarkets. I still haven’t been able to find it in Hobart! If you know where to find it here, please send me an... read more

Cinnamon and cloves

Two of the most adored spices in Brazil that are used to spice up sweet shortbreads, cakes, desserts, hot drinks and breads. List of recipes of this website using cinnamon and/or cloves: ‘Romeo and Juliet’ Goat’s Cheese and Guava Paste Panna Cotta Pineapple and Chilli Caipiroska Brazil Nut and Apple Crumble ‘Quentão’: Spicy Brazilian Mulled Wine Açaí in a Bowl with Home-Made Granola  ... read more

Chunky Corn Flour

Known in Brazil as farinha de milho, this ingredient is probably as popular as the cassava root flour in Brazilian cooking. Commonly used to make farofas (Brazilian crumbs), to thicken sauces, to make cakes and to accompany lunch meals. Available from South American grocers and online*. *Availability in Australia, please check your own country’s online stores, supermarkets or South American Grocers for Brazilian... read more

Coconut

Coconut is the symbol of tropical Brazil. If you ever have a chance to visit Brazil’s north-eastern beaches you will see row after row of coconut trees embellishing the landscape. Coconut is native from Asia, but like bananas, adapted well to Brazil’s conditions and has been part of Brazilian landscape for many centuries. The taste of Brazilian coconut is quite special, actually the best I’ve ever tried. Brazilians are addicted to everything related to coconuts. The fresh water of the green coconut is sold in most beaches. Many people even eat its gelatinous and mild-flavoured flesh after they drink the water! Freshly shredded, desiccated coconut and coconut milk are used to prepare hundreds of types of savoury and sweet dishes. In Brazil, when it comes to coconut, even the coconut shell is used to make hand-crafted items, so nothing goes to waste! For a Brazilian coconut experience try our classic Fish Moqueca (recipe here). List of recipes of this website using coconut: Brazilian Coconut Tea Cake Coconut Mousse with Pineapple Flowers How to Open a Fresh Coconut Beijinho: Coconut Little Kisses Manjar Prune and Coconut Cocktail Crumbed ‘Cuddled’ Prawns with Mango and Coconut Salad... read more

Coconut milk

The artisan coconut milk is a liquid obtained by grating the meat of brown coconut, soaking it in water and then squeezing the  mixture using a muslin (cheese cloth). For Brazilian recipes preferably use either artisan or canned coconut milk. Available from supermarkets and grocery stores. List of recipes of this website using coconut milk: Brazilian Coconut Tea Cake Crumbed ‘Cuddled’ Prawns with Mango and Coconut Salad Coconut Mousse with Pineapple Flowers Manjar Prune and Coconut Cocktail Black-Eyed Pea Fritters (Acarajé) ‘Vatapa’ Bahia’s Nut Puree with Prawns Moqueca: Bahia’s Fish Stew ‘Bobó’ Prawns in Cassava and Palm Oil Sauce  ... read more

Coloral

This is a red ground spice from the Amazon made from the Urucum plant. Sweet paprika is used in my recipes as a... read more

Sweetened Condensed Milk

You will notice that many desserts and sweets have condensed milk so you will immediately understand why Brazil is the largest market of this product in the world. Available from most supermarkets and grocery stores. List of recipes of this website using sweetened condensed milk: Walnut “Cameo” Bonbon Festive Strawberry Ice-Cream Cake Christmas Boozy Chocolate and Hazelnut Brigadeiro Brazilian Strawberry Trifle Brazilian Crème Caramel with Fresh Raspberries Coconut Mousse with Pineapple Flowers Peanut and Chocolate Bon-Bon (Cajuzinho) Avocado Ice-Cream with Cashew Nut Brittle Carrot Cake with Chocolate Topping Passionfruit Mousse Beijinho: Coconut Little Kisses Brigadeiro: Brazilian Chocolate Caramel Strawberry Bon-Bon... read more

Coriander or cilantro

One of the most used herbs around Brazil, especially in the North and Northeast of the country. It is mainly used in fish dishes such as stews, sauces and soups. Available from most supermarkets. List of recipes of this website using coriander: Crumbed ‘Cuddled’ Prawns with Mango and Coconut Salad Black-Eyed Pea Fritters (Acarajé) ‘Vatapa’ Bahia’s Nut Puree with Prawns Coxinha Chicken Fritters Salted Cod (Bacalao) Croquette Moqueca: Bahia’s Fish Stew Galinhada: Brazilian Chicken Stew ‘Bobó’ Prawns in Cassava and Palm Oil... read more

Corn

One of Brazil’s favourite ingredients and, like other parts of South America, the grain and its by products are used to make all sorts of recipes ranging from salads, soups, stews, mashes, soufles through to custards, cakes and ice-creams. List of recipes of this webiste using corn: Brazilian-Style Baked Rice Sweet Corn and Herb Pasties      ... read more

Corn Meal (Super fine polenta)

Known in Brazil as Fuba the corn meal is yellow and it is also known as super fine polenta. Not to be confused with corn flour. Brazilians use this ingredient to make biscuits, breads, cakes and to thicken soups, sauces and stews. Available from selected supermarkets, gourmet shops and online*. *Availability in Australia, please check your own country’s online stores, supermarkets or South American Grocers for Brazilian... read more

Dried cured beef

Not to be confused with jerky beef, Brazil’s chunky dried cured beef is cured with salt and then left to dry outdoors for several days. In the Northeast of the country they also make other types of dried meat such as dried cured goat meat. It needs to be rehydrated before using in recipes. This is another ingredient that I haven’t been able to find in Hobart yet, but I know it is possible to find in Sydney and... read more

Doce de leite

Known in Australia for its Spanish name Dulce de Leche, it is a milk jam essentially made by slowly reducing milk and sugar for a few hours. Also available from South American shops and online. Even though the flavour is not quite the same, Dulce de Leche may be replaced by canned caramel topping or cooked condensed milk. List of recipes of this website using Doce de Leite: Festive Strawberry Ice-Cream... read more

Dried Cod (Bacalá)

Widely used in Portuguese and Brazilian cuisines, it is a cod fish that is preserved by drying after salting. It needs to be rehydrated and desalted to be used in recipes. It is simply delicious with olives, tomatoes, onions, roasted capsicums, potatoes and olive oil. Available from selected gourmet shops, and Portuguese and South American shops*. *Availability in Australia, please check your own country’s online stores, supermarkets or South American Grocers for Brazilian... read more

Erva Mate

Also called Yerba Mate (in Spanish) is a leafy plant largely consumed in South America and it is mainly used to prepare a type of infused drink called Chimarrão. Alex Atala, the world renowned Brazilian chef created a different use for Erva Mate in an innovative recipe called Sweet Potato with Erva Mate Béarnaise in which he ingeniously infuses Béarnaise Sauce with Erva Mate. I would love to try to make that beautiful recipe one day. Erva Mate is available online*. *Availability in Australia, please check your own country’s online stores, supermarkets or South American Grocers for Brazilian... read more

Fennel Seeds

Used to make sweet cakes often in corn meal or coconut-based recipes. Available from supermarkets. List of recipes of this website using fennel seeds: Prawn Croquettes with Saffron Mayonnaise... read more

Guava

A delicious South American fruit with intense flavour that has two varieties: white and red. They are both eaten fresh or, most commonly, the red variety is used to make a popular preserved called Guava Paste (see below). Available from selected supermarkets and fruit markets. Available from large supermarkets and selected grocery stores in major capital cities*. *Availability in Australia, please check your own country’s online stores, supermarkets or South American Grocers for Brazilian... read more

Guava Paste

Known in Portuguese as goiabada it is a thick and sticky preserve made with red guavas and caster sugar. Delicious with buttery cakes and short breads. For a more exotic culinary experience you can do it like Brazilians and try guava paste with a slice of salty rubbery cheese such as haloumi – the combination of flavours works so well that the duo is romantically called by Brazilians Romeo and Juliet. Available online*. *Availability in Australia, please check your own country’s online stores, supermarkets or South American Grocers for Brazilian ingredients. List of recipes of this website using guava paste: Strawberry, Guava Paste and Rosemary Shots ‘Romeo and Juliet’ Goat’s Cheese and Guava Paste Panna... read more

Salted Dried Prawns

Salted dried prawns are used in Brazil’s Northeastern and Northern cuisines to add flavour to seafood stews and sauces. It can be replaced by Chinese salted dried prawns or Thai dried shrimps. Available from Asian grocers*. *Availability in Australia, please check your own country’s online stores, supermarkets or South American Grocers for Brazilian... read more

Kale

A leafy green vegetable that is related to cabbage and broccoli. I am so glad this vegetable has become popular in Australia in recent years. It’s so healthy, versatile and has an exquisite taste and texture. In Brazil it is often shredded very finely and pan-fried with onions and garlic, and sometimes toasted cassava flour is added to make a crumb. It is one of the accompaniments of our national Feijoada Pork and Black Bean stew. It is also great in salads and soups. Available from selected supermarkets and grocery stores*. *Availability in Australia, please check your own country’s online stores, supermarkets or South American Grocers for Brazilian ingredients. List of recipes of this website using kale: When Brazil meets Australia Lamb Shanks Feijoada: Pork and Black Bean... read more

Lime

Probably the most favourite citrus fruit in Brazil, limes are a frequent accompaniment of seafood and fingerfood and are the main ingredient of our national cocktail called Caipirinha. Available all year round from supermarkets*. *Availability in Australia, please check your own country’s online stores, supermarkets or South American Grocers for Brazilian ingredients. List of recipes of this website using lime: Classic Caipirinha Lime Cocktail Crumbed ‘Cuddled’ Prawns with Mango and Coconut Salad Bacalao-Stuffed Petit Capsicums with Tapenade Dressing Avocado Ice-Cream with Cashew Nut Brittle My Garden Salad with Hearts of Palm ‘Vatapa’ Bahia’s Nut Puree with Prawns ‘X-Frango’ Brazilian Grilled Chicken Sandwich ‘Quentão’: Spicy Brazilian Mulled Wine Prawn Croquettes with Saffron Mayonnaise Salted Cod (Bacalao) Croquette Moqueca: Bahia’s Fish Stew ‘Bobó’ Prawns in Cassava and Palm Oil... read more

Manioc (Cassava) Starch or Tapioca Flour

Sweet and sour are the two types of starch extracted after the sedimentation of the cassava juices. Commonly used in Brazil as a replacement of plain flour to make cakes, breads and biscuits. Available from South American grocers and online*. *Availability in Australia, please check your own country’s online stores, supermarkets or South American Grocers for Brazilian... read more

Palm Oil

Known in Brazil as Dende Oil, it is extracted from the reddish pulp of the fruit of the oil palms. In Brazil is used to flavour and thicken stews, purees, as well as for pan and deep-frying. Available from selected gourmet shops, South American shops and online*. *Availability in Australia, please check your own country’s online stores, supermarkets or South American Grocers for Brazilian ingredients. List of recipes of this website using red palm oil (dende): ‘Bobó’ Prawns in Cassava and Palm Oil Sauce Moqueca: Bahia’s Fish Stew ‘Vatapa’ Bahia’s Nut Puree with Prawns Black-Eyed Pea Fritters (Acarajé) Crumbed ‘Cuddled’ Prawns with Mango and Coconut Salad  ... read more

Papaya

Not to be confused with paw-paw, papaya is dark orange in colour and it is sweeter and less bitter than paw-paw. It is eaten fresh in Brazil for breakfast or as a snack served with yogurt and honey. Also used to make our famous dessert Papaya Custard with Cassis Liqueur. Available from selected fruit and vegetable markets and large supermarkets*. *Availability in Australia, please check your own country’s online stores, supermarkets or South American Grocers for Brazilian... read more

Parsley and Spring Onions (Scallions)

This herb duo is called in Brazil cheiro verde which roughly translates as ‘green scent’. Along with coriander, parsley and spring onions (or scallions) are the most used herbs in Brazilian cooking. Recipes of this website using parsley and/or spring onions: Brazilian-Style Beef Stroganoff Salpicão Brazilian Chicken Salad Piri-Piri Chicken with Chickpea Salad Speck and Cassava Flour Crumb Green Summer Salad with Caramelised Walnuts Sweet Corn and Herb Pasties Bacalao-Stuffed Petit Capsicums with Tapenade Dressing Brazilian Beef Stew with Rice and Warm Salad Pastel: Brazil’s Beef Mince Pastry Coxinha Chicken Fritters Country-Style Brazilian Chicken Pie Prawn Croquettes with Saffron Mayonnaise Salted Cod (Bacalao) Croquette Galinhada: Brazilian Chicken Stew Feijoada: Pork and Black Bean Stew                ... read more

Passionfruit

Passionfruit – Native from Brazil and known as maracujá, passionfruit is widely used in the country to make drinks, cakes, desserts and, more recently, the juice is also incorporated in sauces that accompany seafood. Available from supermarkets*. *Availability in Australia, please check your own country’s online stores, supermarkets or South American Grocers for Brazilian ingredients. List of recipes of this website using passionfruit: Passionfruit... read more

Peanut

Contrary to what many people think, peanut not a nut but a plant of the  pulse family and is related to carob and licorice. Peanut is native to South America and in the beginning of the 16th century the Portuguese sailors introduced it into the Philippines where it spread all over Asia. Brazil is one of the largest producers of peanuts in the world and they are a staple ingredient in Brazil being part of many of Brazil’s classic dishes. The iconic dish of the state of Bahia called vatapá is made with ground peanuts, cashew nuts, coconut milk, red palm oil (dendê). Peanuts are also used extensively to make sweets and desserts. Paçoca is a cylindrical shaped sweet that is made with finely ground peanuts and sugar and has a flavour similar to peanut butter but sweeter. The Brazilian peanut brittle called Pé-de-Moleque (translates as little boy’s foot) is a typical candy sold in the Saint John’s parties that happen all over the country during the month of June. Cajuzinho is a sweet made with peanuts and it is served in kid’s birthday parties. Available from supermarkets. List of Brazilian dishes of this website using peanuts: ‘Vatapa’ Bahia’s Nut Puree with Prawns Peanut and Chocolate Bon-Bon... read more

Pineapple

Fruit indigenous to Brazil, pineapple is eaten all over the country in its fresh form, as dessert ingredient or to make drinks. Available from supermarkets. List of recipes of this website using pineapple: Pineapple and Chilli Caipiroska Açaí in a Bowl with Home-Made... read more

Preserved Hearts of Palm

It is a cylinder-shaped vegetable harvested from the inner core of some palm trees. Some hearts of palm can be eaten raw, cooked or roasted but in Brazil the preserved ones still reign supreme in home-made recipes. Great in salads, soups and savoury mousses. Available from selected gourmet shops and online*. *Availability in Australia, please check your own country’s online stores, supermarkets or South American Grocers for Brazilian ingredients. List of recipes of this website using preserved hearts of palm: Broad Bean and Hearts of Palm Pizza My Garden Salad with Hearts of Palm Creamy Heart of Palm Soup    ... read more

Pumpkin

It is believed that pumpkins have originated in the Americas. When the Portuguese settlers arrived in Brazil in the beginning of the 16th century, records show that some pumpkin varieties were part of the indigenous crops. In Brazil pumpkins are added to both savoury and sweet dishes. In many savoury dishes pumpkin is combined with dried cured beef. There is also Quibebe, a very simple side dish made with sautéed onions, garlic, pumpkin and herbs, which commonly accompanies dishes with smoked or roasted pork. Another classic is the dish known as “Camarão na Moranga” which is essentially a roasted pumpkin bowl filled either prawn or dried cured beef sauce. In sweet dishes, pumpkin is usually paired with coconut, like the pumpkin flan recipe in which cooked pumpkin is mixed with eggs, milk, condensed milk and coconut milk and coconut. Green pumpkins are used to make preserves and sweets. List of recipes of this website using pumpkin: Pumpkin Timbale with Kale Chips, Speck and Pickled Radish... read more

Red chilli

Widely used in Brazil, specially in the North and Northeast of the country to spice up dishes and to prepare sauces, jams and other preserves. Available from supermarkets. List of recipes of this website using chillies: Pineapple and Chilli Caipiroska Chocolate and Chilli Soccer Ball Truffles Crumbed ‘Cuddled’ Prawns with Mango and Coconut Salad Black-Eyed Pea Fritters (Acaraje) Bacalao-Stuffed Petit Capsicums with Tapenade Dressing ‘Vatapa’ Bahia’s Nut Puree with Prawns Coxinha Chicken Fritters Prawn Croquettes with Saffron Mayonnaise Moqueca: Bahia’s Fish Stew Galinhada: Brazilian Chicken Stew Feijoada: Pork and Black Bean Stew ‘Bobó’ Prawns in Cassava and Palm Oil Sauce    ... read more

Sweet Potato

The two types of sweet potato eaten in Brazil are the ones with white and yellow flesh which are less sweet than the orange variety. Sweet potatoes are native to tropical America and in ancient times were cultivated by many Brazilian indigenous tribes. In the Brazilian culinary, they are often eaten as a side dish or as a dessert. As a side dish it is prepared deep-fried or simply boiled or steamed. One of the sweet potato desserts I used to have in my childhood is the cooked potato caramelised with caster sugar served with cream or a little bit of milk. Sweet potatoes are also used in Brazil to make preserves, cakes and... read more

Tapioca Pearls

The tapioca pearls are a cassava by-product that pop like popcorn when the moist starch is cooked in a very hot pan. In Brazil it is often used to make our classic dessert called Sagu, in which the tapioca pearls are cooked in red wine and spices and served with a milky custard. In more modern Brazilian recipes, such as Alex Atala’s, cooked tapioca pearls are used to add texture to sauces in fish dishes. Available from selected Asian grocers and online*. *Availability in Australia, please check your own country’s online stores, supermarkets or South American Grocers for Brazilian... read more

Tucupi

An ancient cassava by-product that has been made by the indigenous people of the Amazon for many centuries. The tucupi juice is obtained after the starch is separated from its liquid. Tucupi is then cooked for several hours to remove its poisonous content and then seasoned with garlic, salt and Amazon herbs. Commonly used in soups, stocks and stews. Still unavailable in... read more